Don’t Let Politics Deplete Your Social Capital

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This photograph was taken at the 1000th episode. Michael Malice is in the middle holding Tom Woods daughter and wearing a North Korean army uniform – which is legit and was smuggled out of North Korea. Credit: Tom Woods Facebook fan page

At the 1000th episode of the popular The Tom Woods Show podcast by historian and commentator Thomas E. Woods in Orlando, Florifa in late September,  media personality Michael Malice said a few words which were not new to me but still stuck.

Malice said that he survives in very liberal New York City by not getting into political arguments with people; basically keeping clear of politics for the most part. He further said, you never know who you might need some day for some help and getting into political arguments and conflict is a quick way of burning bridges.

We live in a time of great political polarization. I see people all the time get into pointless arguments over the latest manufactured political and societal fights which everyone is meant to have an opinion over and must show some outrage. I see them as pointless because very rarely do such arguments change peoples views. They do nothing but create more division. Plus, they are a pure and utter waste of time!

Don’t get into arguments with people over political issues. Nothing is more divisive than politics. People who might agree to disagree under normal circumstances become mortal enemies once an issue becomes political. Basically politics is a form of conflict.

Do your best to emphasize what you have more in common with others and not your differences. If you find yourself in situations were things are getting heated or political, try and answer in the most polite manner possible and don’t try and prove you are right and others are wrong. If anything find a way of punting.

Taking on this disposition might not suit some peoples egos or propensities to argue but doing so will go a very long way in creating  social capital and building bridges.

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